The Church in Exile: Recovering a Reformed View of the Displaced Community

Taken from the Theology Matters conference of 2021.

Jennifer Powell McNutt
Jennifer Powell McNutthttps://www.wheaton.edu/academics/faculty/jennifer-powell-mcnutt/
Jennifer Powell McNutt is the Franklin S. Dyrness Associate Professor of Biblical and Theological Studies at Wheaton College. She is author of the award-winning book, Calvin Meets Voltaire: The Clergy of Geneva in the Age of Enlightenment, 1685–1798, a specialist in the Reformation and post-Reformation periods, and a Fellow in the Royal Historical Society. Rev. Dr. McNutt is also an ordained minister in the PCUSA, co-president of McNuttshell Ministries, Inc. with her husband, David McNutt, with whom she also serves as a parish associate at First Presbyterian Church of Glen Ellyn, Illinois. They have three lovely children.

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